NIHR POLICY RESEARCH UNIT IN HEALTH AND
SOCIAL CARE SYSTEMS AND COMMISSIONING

PRUComm reports

Nov 2019: Integrated Care Systems: What can current reforms learn from past research on regional co-ordination of health and care in England? A literature review
11 November 2019
This report presents the findings of a literature review examining research into previous intermediate tiers in the NHS.

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Jan 2019: National evaluation of the Vanguard new care models programme. Interim report: understanding the national support programme
22 January 2019
This short report sets out the results of one part of the research, a survey of Strategic Transformation Partnership (STP) Leads, to examine how the Vanguard programme has been understood and managed at the meso level.

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Nov 2018: Investigating recent developments in the commissioning system
23 November 2018
This study aimed to investigate how recent policy developments, including the emphasis on place-based planning, have affected the process of commissioning and planning at local level.

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Jul 2018: Impact of removing indicators from the Quality and Outcomes Framework
4 July 2018
The project aimed to analyse the effect of indicator removal in a large, nationally-representative cohort of patients whose care quality has been consistently recorded over time. The research provides intelligence on the likely patient impacts of changing existing incentives. This is key to understanding the risks of change, but also what the change in practice activity has been as a consequence of removing incentives.

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May 2018: Numbers of GPs who want out within 5 years at all-time high
31 May 2018
The number of GPs who say they are likely to quit direct patient care within five years rose to 39% in 2017 from 35% in 2015, according to a new survey carried out by University of Manchester researchers.

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Mar 2018: Understanding primary care co-commissioning: Uptake, development, and impacts. Final report
21 March 2018
This report presents the findings from a study following the development of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in England. This is the third phase of the project, which aims to understand the ways in which CCGs are responding to their new primary care co-commissioning responsibilities from April 2015. The study provides detailed evidence about the experiences of CCGs as they took on delegated responsibility for primary care commissioning.

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Mar 2018: Next steps in commissioning through competition and cooperation (2016-2017)
4 March 2018
The aims of this stage of the field work remained the same as those of the initial study. The project aimed to investigate how commissioners in local health systems managed the interplay of competition and cooperation in their local health economies, looking at acute and community health services (CHS).

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Nov 2017: How are CCGs managing conflicts of interest under primary care co-commissioning in England? A qualitative analysis
13 November 2017
From April 2015, NHS England (NHSE) started to devolve responsibility for commissioning primary care services to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). The aim of this paper is to explore how CCGs are managing potential conflicts of interest associated with groups of GPs commissioning themselves or their practices to provide services.

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Aug 2017: PRUComm Research Review 2017
15 August 2017
This is our fifth annual review of research and provides a brief overview of our research activities.

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Feb 2017: Review of the Quality and Outcomes Framework in England
8 February 2017
This report reviews the evidence of effectiveness of Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) in the context of a changing policy landscape.

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Nov 2016: Improving GP recruitment and retention needs a long-term strategy
4 November 2016
This report is an evidence synthesis on GP recruitment, retention and re-employment.

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Oct 2016: Alliance contracting, prime contracting and outcome based contracting: What can the NHS learn from elsewhere?
25 October 2016
This report is part of the research of the Policy Research Unit in Commissioning and the Health Care System (PRUComm) on new models of contracting in the NHS, commissioned by the Department of Health.

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Aug 2016: PRUComm Research Review
11 September 2016
This is the fourth annual review of our research and provides a brief overview of our current research activities.

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Jul 2015: PHOENIX: Public Health and Obesity in England – The new infrastructure examined
15 July 2016
The PHOENIX project aims to examine the impact of structural changes to the health and care system in England on the functioning of the public health system, and on the approaches taken to improving the public’s health.

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Jun 2016: Commissioning through competition and cooperation
17 June 2016
This is a final report of our project investigating how commissioners in local health systems managed the interplay of competition and cooperation in their local health economies, looking at acute and community health services.

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Apr 2016: Understanding primary care co-commissioning: Uptake, scope of activity and process of change - An Interim Report
20 April 2016
This report presents early findings from the third phase of a longitudinal study following the development of CCGs since their inception in 2011. The over-arching aim of this phase of the project is to explore the significant changes to the work of CCGs as they took varying levels of new responsibility for commissioning primary care services from April 2015.

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Oct 2015: Exploring the GP ‘added value’ in commissioning
13 October 2015
In this study we explored the potential added value that clinicians, specifically GPs, bring to the commissioning process in interviews, and followed this up with observations of commissioners at work. Our research used ‘Realist Evaluation’ (Pawson & Tilley, 1997) which involves: seeking out participants ‘programme theories’ as to how a particular policy or programme will bring about the desired outcomes; exploring the extent to which these programme theories ‘work’ in the real world; and examining in detail the mechanisms and contexts which underpin them.

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